What is a yeast allergy?

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Yeast is a type of fungus. We use it in baked goods and to make some alcoholic beverages, such as beer. People who are allergic to yeast should avoid foods containing the ingredient.

Those who are allergic to fungi may also need to avoid molds because molds belong to the fungi family.

Published in 1983, The Yeast Connection attributed a wide range of symptoms to a condition termed yeast hypersensitivity — or allergy. Moreover, the authors suggested that many were allergic, or at least sensitive, to yeast.

In 1986, the American Academy of Allergy and Immunology issued a statement calling into question the existence of yeast hypersensitivity. It highlighted scientific shortcomings of research that linked yeast to health problems. In spite of these doubts, some researchers continue to publish on the topic.

Fast facts on yeast allergies:

  • Yeast hypersensitivity remains controversial.
  • Yeast hypersensitivity syndrome may not involve an allergy. It is important to distinguish the purported effects of this syndrome from a real allergy to yeast.
  • People with severe yeast allergies may need to avoid eating outside the home.

Symptoms of a yeast allergy

Yeast allergy may be triggered by dry or wet yeast laid out on table.
Yeast allergy symptoms may include stomach pain, gas, and skin irritation.

Yeast is present in many foods. People who are allergic to yeast can have reactions that range from mild to severe.

Symptoms may include gastrointestinal problems, such as diarrhea, bloating, gas, and stomach discomfort. Some people develop a rash or another type of skin irritation.

Less frequently, people with yeast allergies experience a severe reaction called anaphylaxis. This can cause low blood pressure, a swollen throat, and difficulty breathing.

Anaphylaxis can be fatal and is considered a life-threatening medical emergency. Individuals with a history of anaphylaxis may need to carry an epinephrine injector, such as an EpiPen.

Fungi, including mold and yeast, reproduce through tiny spores that may travel through the air. People with allergies to these substances may develop respiratory symptoms when they inhale the spores.

Symptoms of an allergy to inhaled yeast and mold spores may include:

  • hives
  • congestion
  • breathing difficulties

This allergy may also trigger an attack in people with asthma.

However, the American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology caution that no study has conclusively linked airborne allergens to severe allergic reactions. Even among people who have a severe allergy to yeast in food, inhaled yeast is unlikely to trigger a reaction.

Treatment for a yeast allergy

antihistamine medication in blister pack with red pills.
Antihistamines may be recommended to manage the symptoms of a yeast allergy.

Some alternative medicine practitioners who believe in yeast hypersensitivity promote the use of antifungal medications, such as nystatin. There is little scientific evidence supporting the use of these drugs in people who do not have fungal infections.

The most effective treatment for a diagnosed yeast allergy is to avoid foods containing yeast. People who eat yeast and develop mild allergic reactions, such as rashes, can often manage their symptoms with antihistamines.

Those with anaphylactic reactions will need emergency medical care if they accidentally eat yeast. An epinephrine injector can prevent anaphylaxis from turning deadly.

Diagnosis

Practitioners of alternative medicine often diagnose yeast hypersensitivity syndrome, based on symptoms alone.

True yeast allergies can be diagnosed by an allergist, who will ask about a history of allergic reactions to certain foods. They may also perform a skin prick test to confirm the diagnosis. This will involve the allergist applying a tiny amount of yeast to the skin, to test for a reaction.

They may also recommend a blood test, which will determine the presence of an antibody protein that can indicate a food allergy.

People with a history of anaphylactic reactions to yeast or any other allergen in food may need to undergo comprehensive testing. This can identify additional allergens and may prevent life-threatening reactions.

Foods to avoid

Sourdough bread in trays
Sourdough breads and cakes may contain yeast, and trigger an allergic reaction.

Read labels carefully to reduce the risk of accidentally consuming yeast. Foods that contain yeast include:

  • Baked goods: Yeast is commonly used to leaven foods, such as cakes and sourdough breads.
  • Alcoholic beverages: Yeast is used to ferment sugar in most alcoholic beverages. However, distilled spirits may not contain very much yeast.
  • Some food spreads: Products such as Marmite and Vegemite contain yeast.

Because some people with yeast allergies may also be allergic to mold, testing can help to determine whether additional foods may cause reactions. These can include cheeses made with mold.

Risk factors

An allergy occurs when the body overreacts to a substance that may be harmless to other people. The body treats this substance — the allergen — like a dangerous invader, and a range of symptoms can develop. Researchers have yet to agree about why certain people develop allergies, but a combination of environmental factors and genetics may be to blame.

There has been little research into risk factors for yeast allergies. It is impossible to predict with certainty whether someone will develop this allergy and how severe their reactions will be. If a person suspects that they have a yeast allergy, they should consult a doctor.

An individual with a history of food allergies should consider testing, and they should ensure that they are being tested for an allergy to yeast. Having one allergy puts a person at risk for others. This is especially true for people with severe anaphylactic reactions.

Takeaway

The controversial idea that some people are hypersensitive to yeast continues to influence alternative medicine. For very few people, however, yeast allergies can cause a range of symptoms. People who think they have either disorder should consult a doctor for testing.

Self-diagnosis of allergies can lead to unnecessary fear. A professional diagnosis may be necessary to prevent severe allergic reactions. If a person has a severe yeast allergy, they may need to carry an epinephrine injector.

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/321142.php

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Osamudiamen Is a Freelance Writer, as well as a Life & Business Coach. He is a determined & optimistic goal-getter who believes that everything is possible given the right focus & persistence. He is a .He is the CEO of Infokings Resources Ltd
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